Pet

Pet

Book - 2019
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In a near-future society that claims to have gotten rid of all monstrous people, a creature emerges from a painting seventeen-year-old Jam's mother created, a hunter from another world seeking a real-life monster.
Publisher: New York : Make Me a World, 2019
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780525647072
0525647074
Branch Call Number: YA FICTION Emezi
Characteristics: 204 pages ; 22 cm

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sjpl_rebekah Oct 30, 2019

After reading this book I am surprised that it is cataloged as YA Fiction. It really read like J Fiction to me. I had to keep reminding myself that the main character is seventeen, because her character seems much younger.

The setting is a sort of Utopia where the "monsters" have b... Read More »


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penelopegomez
Feb 04, 2020

I was really astonished by this book. I honestly had no idea what direction this book was going to go when I first started reading. At first I thought this book was placed in modern times, but as you continue reading you'll discover that that's not quite the case. In this book the main character Jam is a transgender girl, who is also deaf. This book starts off normally enough but all of a sudden a "Hunter" named Pet emerges from a painting. Pet claims that there is a monster living in Jam's best friends house. It is up to Jam and Pet to stop this monster from causing any more harm to children. The way that this character, Pet is described reminded me a lot of the soul reaper in the graphic novel "Death Note." Jam basically has her own invisible companion that nobody can see. He is described as a scary animal-like beast with wings. I really liked the fantastical elements set in this "modern" day setting. This book is honestly about the very hard topic of child abuse, but it was astonishing to see this subject talked about in this fantastical like way where I don't think it would be triggering to its readers. Akwaeke Emezi did an amazing job of shedding light on such a tough subject, in such a whimsical way as to not overwhelm her readers. I feel like this would be such a great book to discuss. 5out of 5 stars, I highly recommend it.

sjpl_rebekah Oct 30, 2019

After reading this book I am surprised that it is cataloged as YA Fiction. It really read like J Fiction to me. I had to keep reminding myself that the main character is seventeen, because her character seems much younger.

The setting is a sort of Utopia where the "monsters" have been eliminated and everyone treats each other nicely (or so they think). From the very first chapter I could have outlined the entire plot of the story. I can't say much more than what is in the synopsis without completely giving everything away, but I can tell you that the story follows a very predictable path.

I admire what the author is trying to do with this book - she is revealing the dangers of complacency and denial - but it is all overly simplified. The backstory as to how this "Utopia" setting was achieved is completely preposterous. Basically anyone and everyone who has ever committed an atrocity has supposedly been identified and imprisoned. Society has realized the error of their ways and all people are accepted regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, ableness, etc, etc., etc. This book was very short, but I honestly think it could have been shorter. This would have been a great short story for an anthology if all the repetitive filler was removed.

I generally enjoy books that employ elements of magical realism, but this one just wasn't for me.

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